Featured

Mini Pause #7: Great Skin Health Inside & Out

How to Make Your Skin Health a Priority–One Habit at a Time

TL,DR (too long, didn’t read)

We lose collagen and elastin at a rate of one percent per year, and over time, we often see more wrinkles, poor elasticity, and decreased hydration of the skin. Supplementation and a proper skincare routine can help to reverse the skin aging process.

I’ve outlined best practices in food, lifestyle, supplements, and skin routines in today’s newsletter. The links throughout take you right to the science behind this information.

WHY

As we age, many of us notice changes in skin quality. Dull skin, fine lines, and a loss of elasticity are among the most common grievances in women during perimenopause and menopause.

While fillers and injectables are certainly options, I would put them second in line after a few items well within your control–your nutrition (or your internal health), your exercise habits, and your skin routine (external topicals). All of these can address wrinkles, elasticity, and hydration both from the inside out and outside in.

While you likely won’t see immediate results, when done consistently, you may see a noticeable difference in your skin in about three months.

I’ve made a personal goal to have my best skin ever this year, and it has become such an interesting rabbit hole to go down!

WHAT

Fine Lines & Wrinkles
The facial muscles are a group of about 20 flat skeletal muscles lying underneath the skin of the face and scalp. Most of them originate from the bones or fibrous structures of the skull and radiate to insert on the skin. This is a unique feature of facial muscles–a direct insertion point to the skin.

Other skeletal muscles typically originate from and insert into bone. The insertion directly into the skin is what allows for the face to move.

Years of facial expression start to show up at perpendicular angles to the muscle fibres. For example, the infamous “11” lines in between the eyebrows are exactly perpendicular to the muscle fibres of the procerus muscle. This muscle originates off the nasal bone and then flares upwards and inserts into the skin of the forehead. It is involved in furrowing or depressing the medial part (inside part) of the eyebrow.

This is in part due to wear and tear, but also an accumulation of oxidative stress, and a decrease in collagen and elastin production. As we age, this can look like a one- to two-percent loss per year.

Elasticity
It’s well known that collagen hydrolysate has several positive biological actions in the body, such as acting as an antioxidant, an antihypertensive, and being involved in lipid-lowering activities, and reparative actions in damaged skin.

Collagen is super interesting because it has a dual action in the skin where it first provides the building block components for collagen and elastin to be synthesized in the body. It then binds to dermal receptors to stimulate the synthesis of collagen and elastin as well as hyaluronic acid.

I think collagen is the heavyweight champ of skin supplements.

Hydration
Drink more water–YES! We all have to do this.

I typically aim to drink 3-4 litres daily. Most days, I settle on 2.5 to 3 litres. One thing that helps me is flavoring the water. I often add cucumbers and blueberries to a big jug. This little action makes the water feel more special.

Another component of hydration is your ability to hold onto that hydration. This is where you might find an electrolyte helpful.

Electrolytes, including sodium, potassium, and chloride, are minerals that carry an electric charge when they dissolve in water. Sodium is a cation with a positive charge (Na2+), while chloride is an anion with a negative charge (Cl2-). Other common electrolytes include phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium.

Electrolytes are involved in:

  • transporting nutrients to cells,
  • transporting waste out of cells,
  • proper function of nerves, heart, brain, and muscles,
  • pH balance, and
  • fluid balance.

Hormones
While hot flashes are often ascribed to “typical” menopausal symptoms, declining levels of estrogen can have devastating effects on our skin and hair.

Decreased estrogen levels in perimenopause and menopause can look like:

  • skin dryness and itchiness (pruritus),
  • skin thinning and atrophy,
  • wrinkles and sagging,
  • poor wound healing, and
  • reduced vascularity of the skin.

Many women find that using topical estradiol on the face and décolletage area improves the appearance of the skin. This topical application does not act systemically when applied only to the face. However, you must discuss this use with your primary healthcare provider and consider your individual risk factors.

HOW

LIFESTYLE INPUTS
Generally, consuming darker-colored foods like blueberries, blackberries, pomegranates, cherries, raspberries, etc., are great for skin health as they contain polyphenols that love your skin. Salmon, avocados, nuts, and seeds are good foods to be consuming often for their healthy fats.

Resistance Training: In researching for this newsletter, I was delighted to discover that resistance training also positively contributes to healthy skin by reducing circulating inflammation, increasing skin turnover rates, and by thickening the dermal matrix.

  • This is great for women in their 40s and beyond! Why? Because the tendency is for our skin to get thinner with declining collagen and estrogen levels.

Cardio: Tomato-faced cardio bunnies rejoice! Regular cardio is going to be wonderful for improving circulation to the face, which allows the blood to deliver nutrients to the skin.

  • Cardio also helps to increase mitochondrial function of the skin cells and reduce circulatory inflammation factors.

Red Light Therapy: This has been one of the interventions (above resistance training and regular cardio) with which I have noticed the biggest difference.

  • Research shows that red light therapy, or photobiomodulation, improves the enhancement of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, cell signaling and growth factor synthesis, and the reduction of oxidative stress.
  • I invested in the BON CHARGE Red Light Face Mask and the Red Light Neck & Chest Mask and I use them daily in the morning when I check my emails. This is a simple habit stack! I always check my emails at my desk, so it’s an ideal time for me to pop these on while I organize my inbox.

Supplements: Collagen Supplementation: A daily scoop of hydrolyzed collagen has been shown to augment the effects of aging including poor elasticity, fine lines and wrinkles, and skin hydration. I add a heaping scoop of Equip Foods collagen or mindbodygreen collagen to my morning water as I’m heading to the gym.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D is well known for improving many hallmarks of skin aging. Here are a few good things that it does:

  • prevents DNA damage,
  • stimulates DNA repair mechanisms,
  • regulates keratinocyte proliferation (keratinocytes produce keratin and make up 90 percent of your epidermal cells), and
  • regulates mighty antioxidative responses.

I love the mindbodygreen Vitamin D3/K2 supplements. I take 4000 IU in the spring and summertime, and pump it up to 6000 IU in the wintertime.

Electrolytes: I use LMNT, a salt-based electrolyte, daily with hot water. My current favorite is Chocolate Caramel. My regular rotation includes Watermelon, Grapefruit, and Raspberry.

OUTSIDE INPUTS
I have incorporated these steps into my skincare routine following a conversation with my friend Dr. Tony Youn on the Better! podcast at the start of this year. This cadence included Dr. Youn’s routine essentials for better skin through topicals:

Morning Skin Routine: 1. Cleanser, 2. Vitamin C or antioxidant serum, 3. Sunscreen

Evening Skin Routine: 1. Cleanser, 2. Retinoid, 3. Moisturizer

I am also becoming interested in peptides and stem cells and their ability to help rejuvenate the skin. Coming up:

  • Dr. Adeel Khan will be a guest on the podcast to discuss regenerative medicine through stem cells and peptides (not just for skin, but aging in general).
  • I’m visiting his clinic to have some peptide treatments done on my skin and can’t wait to share the results with you!
  • And, I’m already knee-deep in stem cell and peptide research and will have a special Mini Pause newsletter on this topic.

NOW

You may have some of these foundations already in place like eating good fats, or resistance training.

I want you to pick only one item from the HOW section that you want to incorporate into your existing skin routine. One of the best ways to make it “stick” is to pair it with something you are already doing. For example:

  • I put collagen into water I am already taking to the gym.
  • I use my red light face mask when I am seated and already checking my emails in the morning.

Habit stacking is an efficient way to make a small–and significant change–to your routine that won’t be overwhelming. This way the new habit is not an extra step, it is blending into an existing one.

YOUR TURN!

What are your skincare questions? Which one of these steps are you going to try? Let me know at support@drstephanieestima.com.

Discover Beauty That Fits Your Style

When I find something awesome that makes a difference in my health, I want to share it with my Bettys. So, if you vist the items I’ve shared in today’s newsletter, here are discount codes for you to use. I hope you love these products as much as I do!

  • Equip Foods collagen; use code DRSTEPHANIE
  • mindbodygreen collagen; use code DRSTEPHANIE
  • mindbodygreen vitamin D3/K2; use code DRSTEPHANIE
  • LMNT electrolytes; direct link to free sample pack with purchase
  • OneSkin peptide skincare (cleanser, sunscreen, moisturizer); use code DRSTEPHANIE
  • Timeline Skin Health serum; use code ESTIMASKIN
  • BON CHARGE red light masks; use code DRSTEPHANIE
  • Bonus! In a previous Mini Pause issue, I mentioned my love affair with Rose Best Skin Ever and Rose Glow Serum by Living Libations. They are both divine in a bottle! The link auto-applies a discount at checkout.

Question of the Week

Q: What about fibre?

From the Bettyverse: Thank you, Gabi, for asking for more about this topic!

I have a question related to the comment about fibre. There seems to be so much conflicting information about whether we need fibre at all. For instance, I hear of the carnivore diet being good for autoimmune issues and as long as you have enough dietary fat (not too much, not too little) you will have normal bowel movements. But I’ve also heard that women benefit from fibre to rid the body of excess estrogen.

My personal issue is inflammation of my joints. (For context, I’m 45, perimenopause (regular cycles, low progesterone/ estrogen dominant), and have been healthy keto for five years. I manage everything through diet and appropriate supplements. )

Could you say more about whether we “need” fibre and why? And the place of plant-free/fibre-free diets like carnivore?

WHAT THE SCIENCE SAYS

This is a multilayered question and I will try to address all of it succinctly.

I guess the short answer here is, you–need fibre. Full stop. I don’t care if the carnivore community says it isn’t important. That is inconsistent with the robust amount of literature and clinical outcomes that say otherwise.

A staggering amount of evidence demonstrates that fibre consumption reduces heart disease and cancer. (Another meta-analysis review here.) fibre has an unwavering and amazing ability to reduce LDL cholesterol. Many studies have demonstrably shown a 20-25% reduction in LDL cholesterol levels with adequate fibre intake.

In cancer risk, more fibre consumption has best shown a reduction in colorectal cancer by about 20%, as well as other cancers we care about like ovarian and breast cancers. Fibre plays a role in the estrobolome (the area of the gut dedicated to processing estrogen) and does help to bind to and get rid of estrogens.

KEY POINT

If you are going to eat a lot of meat, it is probably a good idea to pair it with a lot of fruit and veg.

Typically, individuals who eat high amounts of meat often miss out on the opportunity to consume foods with fibre. That does drive up the risk for heart disease and cancer over the long term.Vegan ideology might be tempted to conclude that it is meat consumption that drives heart disease and cancer. Hear me on this: it’s the lack of fibre consumption in individuals who consume meat that drives up cancer risk.

Clinically, this is where we need to think with a little bit of nuance.

SHORT-TERM VS. LONG-TERM BEHAVIOR

Going carnivore for a year, in the grand scheme of your 85+ year life doesn’t affect health outcomes. Just like if you have elevated LDL cholesterol levels for one year in the context of 85 years of healthy LDL cholesterol levels also doesn’t marginally affect outcomes. What is far more important is the chronic elevation of LDL over many decades that drives up the risk for these multifactorial diseases.

Imagine it another way. Remember when you were a silly, naive teenager and did dumb stuff with your friends because you thought you were invincible? While the activities you engaged in (and compounds you ingested) were probably really bad for you at the time, they aren’t going to be predictive of health for your entire life. It was a year, or two (or five) of doing dumb stuff. And then you came to your senses and corrected your behavior.

Now, before you send me a message about why I am hating on carnivore and how great the carnivore diet was for you–I get it! I, too, have used carnivore interventions in autoimmune patients with great success. The big idea I am trying to convey is that the intervention, while it worked in the short term, is designed to be transient. It doesn’t last forever.

Because the diet you need when you are sick is not the same one you need when you are well.

YOUR TURN!

I’ll be answering your questions every week right here in the Mini Pause! Let me know what’s on your mind. I’ll be checking for both questions and feedback at support@drstephanieestima.com.

Hey There!

I’m Dr. Stephanie

I’m part geek, part magic and it’s my mission to be a voice for women who just aren’t getting the answers they need about their health - whether that’s from their friends, their family or their primary health providers.

Older Posts Newer Posts